Meet Yvette Calleiro…

Hello, bloggers!!

I am very pleased to welcome to my blog fellow RRBC Member & Guest Author, Yvette Calleiro!! Yvette is this week’s “SPOTLIGHT” Author, so let’s shower her with the incredible support we’re known for!!  :)


The Process of Writing

My writing process has changed throughout the years. When I decided to take a chance at writing a novel, I bought a journal and a mechanical pencil (love those!). I then began thinking of my characters. I used one page for each character. I wrote down his/her name, his/her physical description, and his/her personality. I then jotted down the plot on the next several pages. After that, I carried the journal around with me everywhere. As I had time, I wrote out chapter by chapter in my journal. It was mostly dialogue because that’s how I think. Finally, I sat in front of the computer and typed up the story, filling in the details around the dialogue that I had already created. I used this process for the first three novels that I wrote.

I haven’t published my first two written novels. I will eventually, but I had yet to do so when the idea for The One Discovered came to me. I was actually trying to go the traditional route with my first two novels when I dreamt of my Diasodz. So, I put my first two novels out via query letters and then left them alone to focus on writing The One Discovered. By the time I finished writing it, I realized that the traditional route was not for me and decided to go indie. :-) My dilemma was then deciding which book to publish first. Which book did I want to help me make a name for myself? I knew almost immediately that the Diasodz would win that contest, and so I set about publishing it on my own.
I learned how to format the book through Smashwords. They have a great, free book on the correct way to format an ebook. I also found my amazingly talented cover artist, Tatiana Villa, through Smashwords. And then I discovered Create Space, and my printed book was done! I published my first book on both Smashwords and Amazon, but eventually I switched exclusively to Amazon because I wasn’t getting much traffic at Smashwords (I have no doubt it is because of my inability to promote myself more than because of their website. They get tons of traffic.).

When I went to write The One Enlightened, book two of the Chronicles of the Diasodz, I realized that I would not be able to get the book published in a year’s time (my own deadline) if I wrote out the whole book (as I had with book one) and then typed it up. So, I changed up my process a little bit. I still bought a new journal. I still used my mechanical pencil. I still wrote out all of the characters and their descriptions/elements/powers/etc. Many of them had been written in my first journal, but I rewrote them, knowing that I would need to revisit it while I wrote. I also added new characters that never existed in the first book.

When I wrote The One Discovered, I had actually mapped out the plots for all of the books. When it came time to write book two, I realized how many holes were in that original plot sketch. So, as I wrote the plot for book two in the new journal, I added many scenes. I also realized that I had a whole new world that I needed to create. I have absolutely no artistic ability, but I actually had to map out the levels of the house to keep everything straight in my mind.

This time, I did not write out the whole book. My life had become even busier than it had been before. I started writing out the chapters, but I realized that it was just taking too long, so I stopped writing it out and went straight to typing. At first, I thought it would be more difficult for me, but it wasn’t. The only drawback was that I was only able to write the novel when I could be at a computer whereas when I was writing it down, I could write anywhere. Still, it was better than writing it twice. And I met my goal of finishing within the year.

The One Betrayed followed the same process – new journal, same pencil, etc. The One Betrayed posed a new problem for me. Betrayed follows the same timeline as Enlightened. While Enlightened focuses on Sofia’s journey to the new world, Betrayed focuses on a different character’s journey to the new world (I don’t want to give any spoilers just in case someone is reading them). There are points where the two books connect, so it was very important that the events in the timeline made sense. I had to go back to Enlightened and figure out how many days were in the book and then mirror those days in Betrayed. So, it took a little bit more time, but it was worth it.

Now, I’m writing book 4 (no title yet…well, I haven’t share it yet). I’m using the same journal from The One Betrayed because I barely used any of the pages (tree hugger here!) and I got tired of rewriting all of the character descriptions. lol! I liked the process of counting the days, so I’ve done the same thing with book 4. I realized that I need to know the time line because something big has to happen around a certain date, so I need to keep track of it.

Although my process had evolved a bit, my writing keeps flowing. I get ideas in my head all of the time, and they are never in chronological order. I also get random plots for other stories to write pop up everything now and then. I just jot it all down in the notepad of my phone (and then email it to myself for safekeeping) and use it when I need it. I still have a couple of more books to write in this series, and I’m loving every minute of it.

Will my writing process stay the same when I start a new book outside of the series? Will it change into something else? I don’t know. One thing that I do know for certain is that I will be writing, and that is what makes me happy. :-)

 

TheOneDiscovered - Cover Design 10

 

About Yvette

yvette

 

Yvette M. Calleiro is a heavily addicted reader of both young adult and adult novels. She spends most of her time pseudo-living in paranormal worlds with her fictional friends (and boyfriends). She’s also been known to run on the elliptical machine or ride the stationary bike at her gym for hours while reading anything from paranormal to fantasy to suspenseful thrillers.

When she’s living amongst real people, Yvette M. Calleiro is a high school reading teacher. She’s been sharing her love of literature with her students for over nineteen years. Besides writing about the various characters that whisper (and sometimes scream) in her head, she enjoys traveling, watching movies, spending quality time with family and friends, and enjoying the beauty of the ocean.

Yvette lives in Miami, Florida, with her beautiful son who allows her to enjoy children’s literature all over again. She also shares her space with an assortment of crazy saltwater animals in her 300-gallon tank.

 

To learn more about Yvette M. Calleiro or to purchase The One Discovered,
The One Enlightened, 
and The One Betrayed
 please visit:

Twitter: @YvetteMCalleiro

Facebook: http://facebook.com/yvettemcalleiro

Website: http://yvettemcalleiro.blogspot.com 

Book Link:  https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00I4L2Q40/


Thank you so much for joining us today!! Please check out Yvette’s books and don’t forget to visit the rest of her awesome “SPOTLIGHT” Author Blog Tour!!!

Until next time………Happy Reading & Reviewing!!!

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38 Comments

  1. Hi Yvette,
    I too started out by recording in my journals by hand but soon discovered that I couldn’t write as fast as I was thinking. I switch over and started writing my journal as well as the first draft of my manuscript in Evernote. For me the advantage is that I have the evernote app on my iPad and can reach for it early in the morning when some idea or solution pops in my head.

    Like you, I get ideas for stories and I write them down. I also write down my dreams because they lead me to writing ideas. To be quite honest, I write everything down in evernote on my iPad.

    I am really enjoying getting to know you. Each blog presents a deeper side of you that fascinates me as an author because I identify with what you’ve said.
    All the best.

    Thank you also Mar for the presentation.

    Shalom aleichem to you both.
    Patricia

  2. Thanks for sharing your writing process with us, Yvette. I don’t even try to write anything serious with pen and paper – just notes about characters and plot lines. My imaginative juices flow when I’m behind a keyboard, but not with pen in hand. Good luck with the rest of your tour – big day tomorrow on Nonnie’s Shelf and on the air with Bill Ward! Thanks for hosting, Marlena!

    • I’m becoming better at letting my creativity flow on a keyboard, but there is still some kind of nostalgic romance for me when a mechanical pencil is in my hand. I can’t explain it. It just feels like home for me. :-) Even when I’m typing, I have my journal open to my notes and my mechanical pencil right next to it so that I can check off my notes as I type them. Lol! (And I’ll share a little secret with you…No one else is reading this, right? I’m a little nervous about my interview with Bill Ward. Shhh…don’t tell anyone. I’m actually pretty shy. No one really believes that because of how well I express myself in writing, but meet me in person where I have to speak, and my nerves get amp’d up. lol! Plus, Bill Ward is somewhat of a celebrity to me. Shhh…he doesn’t know that. When I first joined RRBC, he was one of the first people to support me. He even read my book and wrote a review. It was such an honor for me that he would take a chance on a young adult novel like mine. So, cross your fingers that I don’t totally embarrass myself tomorrow. lol!) ;-)

  3. Thank you, Yvette. It is always fascinating to learn about the writing process of other authors. I often carry a small blank diary with me, to jot down thoughts (should one arise!). Otherwise, my friend is the keyboard.

    Thank you for hosting, Marlena. :)

    • Thank you for stopping by, Gwen. One of the MANY things that I love about RRBC is how willing we all are to share our “secrets” with one another. It’s comforting to know that there is not a “right” way of doing things. We are all beautiful individuals who find what works best for each of us, and that is what makes each of us wonderful. If an aspiring writer reads this, I hope they know that my way isn’t the “right” way. It’s just my way. And my way is always evolving. I absorb what I learn from each of you, and I may try out other ways to see if it works for me better than my current way. In the end, however I choose to write becomes “my” way. That’s the beauty of being an author. Your process is yours and yours alone, and there is a beautiful freedom in that. :-)

  4. There are so many different ways to approach writing. I’ve got a million yellow Post-It notes with story ideas jotted down, stuck together in a pile, waiting for time enough to be turned into novels and short stories. I’m enjoying your tour, Yvette! Best wishes to you.

    Thanks for sharing your space, Marlena.

  5. I enjoyed the story about your first three novels and the mechanical pencil. I tried the same thing but kept breaking the lead. Too excited to get the story out I guess. Good luck on the rest of the tour and thanks Marlena for hosting.

  6. Timelines can be a bear when you have to have certain events occur on certain days–in my case, on holidays throughout the year. How do you will in all that time with a story without leaving gaps? Writing it down in summary form is a way to go.

    • Rebecca, you aren’t lying about timelines! lol! I jot down plot points – things that must happen in the story. Then, I look for gaps in the story line and fill those in. Then, I figure out how many days pass between events. Since my story follows many different characters, I don’t have as much stress about how much time has passed. When I realized that the grand finale needs to happen at point B and I realized how much needed to happen from point A to point B, it made me really focus on the number of days passing. Having two separate novels with the exact same time line was a little challenging, but it worked out well (at least, I think it did). Right now, everything seems on track, so I’m hoping it stays that way. :-)

  7. I think any writing process has to have an organic element to it and if a mechanical pencil helps you feel productive and open, then keep on doing it! Organic can be organised, even if you’re a total techie, so long as you’re comfortable with your writing environment while leaving you room to grow into your next writerly phase. Looking forward to finding out more about your series, Yvette. :-)
    Thanks for having us all over Mar! :-D

    • Thanks, Jan, and I completely agree with you. I love technology for the ease it has brought into our lives, but I find myself needing a break from the type of energy that surrounds it. I’m a bit of an empath and absorb the energies around me a little too easily, and computers don’t have a healthy energy to them. So, I use technology out of necessity, but I balance it through as many organic elements as I can find. :-)

  8. Yvette, like you, my creativity comes from my physical touch with paper and-in my case–erasermate pen. My editing skills kick in on the keyboard where I make the creative words flow properly.I learned a lesson with my first book and will never try and write without some kind of road map Oh, and don’t give Bill Ward another thought. He gave me one of the best reviews I ever got and when I met him on Blog talk radio he made me feel as if we were having coffee–or maybe tea since he’s British–at my kitchen table. He is one of the many really charming, sweet and down to earth men we have in this club. Besides, remember that no one can see you fidget on radio–just your lovely picture. I look forward to hearing your interview!

    Mar, thank for having all of us at your blog to celebrate Yvette!!

    • Lol! Thank you, Micki. I love tea so I just might make myself a cup for my radio interview now that I know that Bill likes it. ;-) I tried using an erasermate pen when I was younger (blue ink because it’s prettier), but the erasers never erased enough for me. I have OCD tendencies and a bit (*cough* a lot) of perfectionism in me, so the smears drove me crazy. I’m sure they’ve improved since then, but the mechanical pencil stole my heart, and I’m not cheating on it. ;-)

  9. I love this post, Yvette! I have handwritten stories before but never a full novel. My biggest problem is that I often struggle to read my writing, it’s so messy, lols! :) Am enjoying getting to know you better on this tour, and it’s always fascinating to discover another writer’s process :) Best of luck with everything and congrats on your RRBC Spotlight! :)

    Mar, thank you so much for always being such a wonderful host :)

    • I’ve heard that those with messy writing tend to have very high IQs. ;-) I’m grateful that my handwriting is legible, though sometimes I’ll write so quickly that my cursive blends letters together. I’m pretty good at figuring it out later, though (thank goodness!). I’m most grateful that I learned cursive writing as a child because it lets me get thoughts down more quickly. It frustrates me that school-age kids are not learning cursive anymore in our schools. I’m currently working on teaching my son cursive writing at home, and he’s getting the hang of it. Sadly, it’s becoming a lost art.

  10. Just reading about your writing process makes me say “Wow”! especially that first beginning, of writing down first, and typing later. I could never do that. For me, that will be like double work. :), but that is me!… Thank you Marlena for hosting her.

    • It was double the work, but I didn’t realize that until after the third novel. (I can be a little stubborn…lol!) By then, I knew that I wanted to produce the novels in a more timely manner and realized that I’d have to give up some of the manual writing for typing. I still write the plot and time table by hand (okay, and a lot of the dialogue), but most of the story is now typed up in the first draft stage. Baby steps. ;-)

  11. Thanks for sharing your process! Tuning in … to your unique self is key to information flow. Jotting down notes and sketches in my journals is my way of organizing thoughts and dreams. Good luck with all your projects! I lived in Frankfurt many years ago and loved it. Great international city.

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